Everything You Need in One Place

If your relationship has ended, there’s lots of things you’ll need to do…all of the personal, legal and financial stuff. As divorce specialists, that’s where we come in. Take the first step today. Contact us by phone or WhatsApp.

Existing Customer? login with Clio Connect

Ending your relationship can impact every aspect of your life.  You need a legal team that can explain your options and take you through the process step-by-step.  To help you find what you need, we’ve divided our services into the following categories:

Planning a divorce? Explore our FAQ page for quick guides and answers to common questions.

$

Your First Consultation

$

Filing For a Divorce

$

Replying to Divorce Papers

$

Children's Matters

$

Dividing Your Finances

$

Religious Marriages / Khula

$

Wills / Estate Planning

PreNup or PostNups – it’s ok to plan ahead!

We know talking about divorce can feel like the opposite of love and marriage. But when drafted fairly, a pre or post-nup can help families avoid arguments and safeguard their interests. Our family team can offer independent legal advice to explain or prepare a pre- or post-nuptial agreement.

FAQ

Aren't Prenups just for rich people or celebs?

There’s a lot of misinformation and social stigma surrounding prenups. Love shouldn’t involve business contracts. Asking for a prenup is insulting the other person’s intentions. Talking about divorce will lead to bad luck (nazar). Or that they’re only for rich people.   As family law specialists, we know that in the event of a divorce, one of the leading causes of arguments is finances. It makes sense to plan ahead, especially as many couples rely on financial help from their parents to buy a home. Prenups are something for anyone to consider, regardless of how much money, cars, or houses you own.

Aren't Prenups just for rich people or celebs?

There’s a lot of misinformation and social stigma surrounding prenups. Love shouldn’t involve business contracts. Asking for a prenup is insulting the other person’s intentions. Talking about divorce will lead to bad luck (nazar). Or that they’re only for rich people.   As family law specialists, we know that in the event of a divorce, one of the leading causes of arguments is finances. It makes sense to plan ahead, especially as many couples rely on financial help from their parents to buy a home. Prenups are something for anyone to consider, regardless of how much money, cars, or houses you own.

What is a pre-nup?

A pre-nuptial agreement (commonly referred to as a prenup) is a written agreement which is entered into by a couple before their marriage. The agreement sets out how a couple’s finances will be organised in the event of the breakdown of their marriage. They’re a planning tool which can offer couples – and their families – a way to avoid arguments, safeguard financial interests, and shelter from debts.  In situations of domestic violence, they may potentially act as a barrier to ‘coercive control.’

Are they legally binding?

In England & Wales, prenuptial agreements are not legally binding. However, the courts consider them persuasive and will give them “decisive weight” in applications for financial settlement (see Radmacher v Granatino 2010).  However, the agreement must meet the following criteria; 

  • The agreement must be fair.
  • It should not prejudice any children.
  • Both parties must have received separate legal advice.
  • The agreement must be freely entered into by both parties.
  • The agreement must have been made at least 28 days before the wedding.
  • There should be financial disclosure about the wider financial circumstances.
I'm already married. What are my options?

If you are already married and do not have a prenup, you may wish to consider a post-nuptial agreement. Similar to a prenuptial, they set out how any assets will be divided should the marriage breakdown. The only difference is that post-nuptials are signed during your marriage. 

Case Story

A couple gets married. The wife owned several properties and businesses (purchased pre-marriage).  Unfortunately, the couple divorced a few years after they married.  As they did not have an agreement in place, her husband was entitled to half of her assets in the divorce settlement. In order to protect her property and businesses, the couple would have needed to sign a prenuptial agreement.

Case Story

Z and B got married in Pakistan. After they returned to England, Z won the lottery. He decided to buy some new cars with the money. A few years later, B filed for divorce and requested some of Z’s vehicles as part of the divorce settlement. In this situation, if the couple agreed, they could have prepared a post-nuptial once Z won the lottery.

Share This